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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

What My Grief is Like
16 hours ago by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a suicide, or any sudden death, we often feel naive about what to expect regarding our grief responses.   
During the Intense Grieving Process
one day ago by Rev. Charles T. Rubey
In witnessing the courageous grief work of so many adolescents and adults, I draw inspiration. Suicide loss can be counted as an immense, life-changing event for which no one is prepared. Such a fundamental loss means change, within and without, for the surviving person, couple and family. How can we enter into a compulsory change process productively?  How do we address our grief within a marriage or family system when our grief response has such a powerful impact on those who depend on us? 

Archives:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, December 01, 2016 by Father Rubey
Reprinted from December 1999

Two religious traditions celebrate joyful religious holidays during the month of December. Our Jewish brothers and sisters celebrate the Festival of Lights. Our Christian brothers and sisters celebrate the birth of Jesus. Both traditions are joyful and uplifting events. There are family gatherings and there is an emphasis on gift giving for both of these traditions.
Private and Shared Stories of Loss
Thursday, December 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Grief, like any other emotional experience within a family, involves interplay between private and shared realities. Family members will often actively express and share, question and comment, especially in response to a loss that was sudden and unexpected. A suicide elicits not only shock, but a compelling need to make sense of what happened. This is a narrative process that is determined by developmental capacity, and even younger children will listen and wonder and protest a loved one’s sudden death.