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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

How to Survive the Holidays after a Suicide
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 by Jessica Hutchison
The holiday season can be a difficult time for those who have been touched by suicide. For me, the holidays are a reminder of my own dad’s suicide. I will never forget the phone conversation I had with my dad the night before Thanksgiving, 2011. He wasn’t himself; something just wasn’t right. While a month would pass before his life ended, I often consider that night to be the turning point in his life.
A Resource for Rebuilding your Family after the Death of a Loved One, Book Review
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After the death of a spouse or a child a family is consumed by the steps necessary to find stability. Sometimes, when a bereaved parent reviews the past, they will see that there has not been a sense of family stability for a long time. Suicide is sometimes preceded with a history of mental health crises and behavioral reactions that disrupt family life.

Archives:

From the Desk of Jessica Mead
Friday, April 01, 2016 by Jessica Mead
“We humans are social beings. We come into the world as the result of others’ actions. We survive here in dependence on others. Whether we like it or not, there is hardly a moment of our lives when we do not benefit from others’ activities. For this reason it is hardly surprising that most of our happiness arises in the context of our relationships with others.” –Dalai Lama – 
Attending to Family Grief
Friday, April 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Grief really is a family process.  It is private, but also influenced by and shared with family members.  When families use our LOSS Program for Children and Youth we meet unique configurations of individuals that are differentiated by birth order, temperament and personality, gender and age, family role and relationship with the person who died.   After a suicide the caregiver or parent is faced with a sense of need on the part of all of her children at once; yet each one may be presenting differently.  And there is a range of grief responses among children as well as adults that are influenced by developmental stage as well as the attributes I’ve mentioned.  So, how do you attend to the different needs of your bereaved children?  They are watching you in your grief, and you are setting an example for authenticity, hopefulness and the ability to compartmentalize your emotions as your care for those who depend on you.  You begin the process of rebuilding your family by questioning and attending to each child’s loss needs and developmental tasks.  You can reflect to each child what you see and hear as they respond to their loss, and also model self-care, and valuing of genuine grief expression.