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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

How to Survive the Holidays after a Suicide
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 by Jessica Hutchison
The holiday season can be a difficult time for those who have been touched by suicide. For me, the holidays are a reminder of my own dad’s suicide. I will never forget the phone conversation I had with my dad the night before Thanksgiving, 2011. He wasn’t himself; something just wasn’t right. While a month would pass before his life ended, I often consider that night to be the turning point in his life.
A Resource for Rebuilding your Family after the Death of a Loved One, Book Review
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After the death of a spouse or a child a family is consumed by the steps necessary to find stability. Sometimes, when a bereaved parent reviews the past, they will see that there has not been a sense of family stability for a long time. Suicide is sometimes preceded with a history of mental health crises and behavioral reactions that disrupt family life.

Archives:

Is My Child Grieving?
Monday, February 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
I often talk with new LOSS members who are parents with children at home. They are clearly reaching out for direction and support, still shell-shocked perhaps months later, but responding to a sense that they need to make sure their kids are okay. I may hear, “She doesn’t seem to be grieving. How can I tell?” These parents have no problem recognizing their own grief. Clearly, attending to each day is an effort. They struggle with emotional absence where their children are concerned. They are able to talk about the new imbalance in their physical and emotional systems. They describe “waves” of grief, in which they feel overwhelmed with grief and sadness. Their children and teens, on the other hand, appear to have shown only initial sadness, but life still engages them. They play video games, watch TV, do homework, see friends, yet the parent senses that their child has also been changed by the loss. So parents wonder if it is normal when their child appears unchanged.
From the Desk of Debbie Major
Monday, February 01, 2016 by Deborah R. Major, PhD, LCSW
From time to time I am invited to write for this column, most often when Father Rubey is away.  He has written this column every month for many years, and when I attend LOSS groups, often a group member will comment on how something they read in Father’s “From the desk of” column seemed to speak directly to their experience that week.  So it’s always a challenge to write here, knowing that readers are expecting words of wisdom and inspiration.  If you are reading this page, I know that you have either lost a loved one to suicide, or you are trying to help someone who has.  Our readership includes individuals and families that have lost a loved one quite recently, as well as those whose loss is many years in the past.  The Obelisk is also making its way around the world.  We have readers in Australia, in China, in Ireland.  And with the increasing popularity of our email format, it’s impossible to know where in the world these pages might be read, as local survivors with family members in the Philippines or Pakistan or Mexico can, with the click of a mouse, instantly forward the Obelisk to those near and far.  We know that survivors everywhere are searching for information, inspiration, and most importantly, for hope.