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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Friday, February 16, 2018 by Father Ruby
I recently read an article that talked about the issue of “ambush” in the process of the grief journey. By ambush I mean situations where a grieving person is “ambushed” by grief during a routine experience such as grocery shopping.
Telling Children the Truth about Suicide
Friday, February 16, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
The notion of telling children about the suicide of their parent or sibling usually evokes a sense of dread. We want to protect our children.

Archives:

Attachments and Imprints
Friday, January 01, 2016 by by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
When a child begins life, its first developmental task is to attach to the caregiver.   There is no “other” as it is cradled and fed, only the cries for connection when separation is experienced.  And for the parent, the boundary between self and child seems mysteriously non-existent for a while. As the child matures and is compelled to explore the world, distancing is exciting, but also uncomfortable enough that the child looks backward often to balance the stimulation with a sense of security.  The parent, too, is attentive, even vigilant, as the young child pushes toward gradual independence.  Most caregivers will recall some anxiety as they observed this process in the small being that introduced them to the profound experience of bonding.  Most of us learn to attach and to support our loved ones’ independence without a great sense of disruption.  As we become more secure adults, we learn to give space for self-determination to those we care about.  When we carry the attached relationships within us, the connections become flexible and don’t suffer whether our loved ones are close by or in another country. Even with distance, the attachments are not disrupted.

From the desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 by Father Rubey
In December, most of us celebrate holiday events of different religious traditions. The season can stir up a lot of feelings for survivors of a suicide. The season can be very painful for grieving people because there is gaiety and celebration all around us. Grieving people are in no mood to celebrate and would like the holiday season to be stricken from the calendar. That is not going to happen any time soon – if ever. Grieving survivors wonder if they will ever be happy again or feel like living again.