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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Friday, April 20, 2018 by Father Ruby
In May our country celebrates Mother’s Day which is a day when we honor our Mothers who are still here and fondly remember those Mothers who are a part of the hereafter. For those Mothers who are grieving the death of a child from suicide or those children who are grieving the loss of a Mother from suicide this is an especially painful day.
Family Conflict after a Suicide Loss
Friday, April 20, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Infighting and conflict after the death of a primary family member is a difficult but recognized manifestation of grief. Suicide grief, in particular, can take us down to base level, sometimes to our most primitive responses of blame and rage. These initial feelings are common, and often part of the changed world after suicide loss.

Archives:

From the desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 by Father Rubey
In December, most of us celebrate holiday events of different religious traditions. The season can stir up a lot of feelings for survivors of a suicide. The season can be very painful for grieving people because there is gaiety and celebration all around us. Grieving people are in no mood to celebrate and would like the holiday season to be stricken from the calendar. That is not going to happen any time soon – if ever. Grieving survivors wonder if they will ever be happy again or feel like living again. 
Grief and Family Development
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 by Deborah R. Major, PhD, LCSW
Grieving the loss of a loved one to suicide is probably a lifelong process for adults and children alike.  This doesn’t mean that the pain associated with the loss will remain the same over time.  We know there are survivors reading these columns whose loved one died as recently as a few weeks ago, while others are remembering a loss that is many years in the past.  Integration of the loss takes place over time for adults and children, but with important developmental differences.