Get Help Now!  (312) 655-7700
  For Rent or Utility Assistance Click Here!

Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter Visit us on YouTube Follow us Visit us on Twitter Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Instagram Visit us on YouTube Visit us on LinkedIn

Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Father Ruby
In one of the recent LOSS support groups participants found themselves talking about the impact of stigma they experienced in the wake of their loved one’s deaths. Our groups are intended to be a safe place for survivors to meet others and talk about any struggles they are experiencing. There are many things that make suicide more painful and disorienting for those left behind, and one of those things is the experience of stigma.
Private Grief Stories
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Private Grief Stories
On 9/11/17 I was watching speeches and ceremony regarding America’s evolving grief in the wake of its huge loss of life on 9/11/01. The anniversary events were beautifully intentional, formal and moving. I thought about Emily Dickenson’s verse: “After great pain, a formal feeling comes.” And I couldn’t help but think about our LOSS families. Is it odd that I might connect those experiencing the devastation of suicide loss with this grand scale, national observation of lost lives and collective meaning?

Archives:

When Younger Children Learn About Suicide
Monday, September 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Occasionally, during the intake of a  family with children into the LOSS Program for Children and Youth, a parent of a younger child voices concern about what the child might do with information that his or her loved one died by suicide.  The parent may express worry that the child will tell others who would use it to tease the child or to spread gossip.  It is understandable that parents would want to protect children from the misuse of information about a suicide loss.  Because of a lingering stigma attached to suicide, insecurity about how the world will respond is common.   It may require some new thinking on the part of parents if they become aware that their child’s needs around the information doesn’t line up with their own needs or concerns.
Reflections from Jessica Mead
Friday, August 01, 2014 by Jessica Mead
In a recent Workshop on adaptive grieving, I was asked to participate in an exercise where I responded to questions about a significant person in my life who had died. My colleague began asking me questions like, “What kinds of things did your loved one teach you about life?” And, “What strengths did she/he see in you?” These were questions that no one had ever asked me before.  I found myself really enjoying answering them. As I answered, I was able to reflect on my own qualities and characteristics that I had never connected to my father before. It made me think about how much I missed talking about him. Now that it has been 9 years since his death, there are fewer people in my life who knew him well. I no longer live in my childhood home where neighbors and friends would tell me a story about how he helped them do something in their yard. I no longer keep in contact with many of the friends that I had then, and many of our family members who knew my dad for his lifetime have passed away. This exercise really got me thinking about my grief journey, past and present.