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LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by From the Desk of Father Rubey
In January, we begin a New Year and many of us have New Year’s resolutions such as losing weight, getting more exercise or doing something positive to improve our lives such as being more understanding towards our loved ones. Former Vice President Joe Biden recently came out with a memoir detailing events in his life and what he learned from the tragedies.
Empty Space
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a spouse’s suicide surviving parents may look into the rooms of their home and see remnants of a family life that is upside down. As a family begins to acclimate to the disorder posed by the beginning of the grief journey, it might be useful to realize that a world where meaningful structure has been disabled by a traumatic loss adds an element of strangeness in familiar spaces.

Archives:

From the Desk of Deborah Major
Saturday, March 01, 2014 by Deborah Major
Suicide’s unexpected and violent intrusion into our life space throws everything up in the air, the way we imagine an unexpected explosion might propel objects out and away from its central force. Cherished beliefs about oneself, the future, and how the world is supposed to operate are suddenly called into question. Nothing is as we thought. Everything feels unstable, chaotic, random, and unjust; at least in the beginning of the grief journey. This is where many survivors find themselves when we first meet them in our support groups. We suggest that LOSS members come back to the groups for as long as it feels helpful, regardless of how long that is, because in these groups you will find yourself among a nurturing network of other survivors, at varying distances from their loss. It is not unusual to meet in the same monthly group new survivors whose loss was barely three months ago, together with those whose loss occurred one, two, four, seven years ago and beyond. We have heard from new survivors that it can be frightening to enter the room and find group members whose loss was many years ago. We think this fear comes from assuming that the survivor whose loss occurred ten years ago feels the same way as the person whose loss occurred three months ago. This is rarely, if ever, the case. People return year after year because they have something to contribute to others and also because there is something present in the circle that they came to receive.
From the Desk of Father Rubey
Monday, February 03, 2014 by Father Rubey
An aspect of life after a suicide are the new friends that survivors meet at support groups for people who are also grieving the loss of a loved one from suicide. It is often said people meet some of the nicest people that they never wanted to meet when they meet these new friends at a support group. The bond that is formed results from the commonality of losing a loved one from suicide. As time goes on the fact of the suicide that initially bonded these new friends fades as the friendship grows. There is a comfort level with survivors that they do not have to pretend anything because these new friends know exactly what the feelings are that result from losing a loved one from suicide.