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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by From the Desk of Father Rubey
In January, we begin a New Year and many of us have New Year’s resolutions such as losing weight, getting more exercise or doing something positive to improve our lives such as being more understanding towards our loved ones. Former Vice President Joe Biden recently came out with a memoir detailing events in his life and what he learned from the tragedies.
Empty Space
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a spouse’s suicide surviving parents may look into the rooms of their home and see remnants of a family life that is upside down. As a family begins to acclimate to the disorder posed by the beginning of the grief journey, it might be useful to realize that a world where meaningful structure has been disabled by a traumatic loss adds an element of strangeness in familiar spaces.

Archives:

From the Desk of...Father Rubey
Sunday, December 01, 2013 by Father Rubey
During December many of us celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah which are very happy times for the celebrants. It is the festival of lights where there is a lot of gaiety and celebrations. Families come together and exchange gifts and eat all different types of food. I remember years ago I went to spend Christmas with my family in Ireland. My cousin shared with me that many Christmases the main meal was ruined because there was too much celebrating and she forgot that the meal was in the oven. One of the key elements of this season is the giving of gifts. Small children get their lists together for Santa with the hopes that Santa will honor all of the requests. This time of the year is also a very painful time for those who are grieving the death of a loved one from suicide. There is and always will be a key loved one who is missing from the gatherings. The first few Christmases are especially painful for those left behind because this loved one is sorely missed and there is a major void in the gathering and there is a gift missing from this loved one and a lost opportunity to buy something for this loved one.
From the desk of Jessica Mead
Friday, November 01, 2013 by Jessica Mead
We all know that suicide is different. There is something about it that makes the grief process feel different and more complex.  Suicide is traumatic; most of us never expected our loved ones to die in this way. Not only were their deaths unexpected and tragic, but many survivors walk in on the scene of death to discover their loved one’s body, and others witness their loved one’s death, each adding another complex layer of trauma to the already difficult and complex grieving process. I meet many people who heal and grow in the face of such trauma, but it is important to consciously recognize the pain of the loss and find some form of outward expression in order to promote healing.