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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Debbie Major
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 by Debbie Major
When you lose a loved one to suicide, there is so much work involved in getting back to living; so much work involved in getting to a place of wanting to reclaim your life.
Monthly Teen Drop-In Group
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
The LOSS program has a few events that allow members to regularly mark their calendars as a designated time to grieve the loss of their loved one.

Archives:

Caring for Trauma Reactive Children after a Suicide Loss
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
In a suicide bereaved family it is conceivable that each survivor bears some level of trauma. The sudden intrusion of paramedics, ambulances and police with flashing lights, witnessing distraught reactions of parents and especially, exposure to the scene of death will impact the central nervous system of every family member. Even those not physically present at the time the suicide is discovered may be disturbed by intrusive imaginary images and sounds. Parents who seek counseling for their bereaved children know that this loss feels incomprehensible and has far-reaching impact. Whether a child openly shows reactivity and emotional dysregulation or has learned to mask their distress it is smart to assess for trauma. Not all traumatic experiences meet the clinical level of Posttraumatic Stress Syndrome, as defined by the DSM-5, but the extraordinary and shocking nature of suicide loss can give rise to trauma symptoms, which include intrusive remembering, emotional numbing and avoidance as well as general hyper-arousal. Intrusive remembering can look like recurrent disturbing dreams, flashbacks of the experience or heightened reactions to reminders of the loss.
Loss and Learning
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a sudden loss like suicide, families are reeling. Parents may feel like they have lost energy and find that hopeless feelings, apathy or frustration are affecting their interactions with children and teens. Children, in response, may be furtive and watchful of your tears and despair at home, while looking for normalcy in school or with friends outside the home.