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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

How to Survive the Holidays after a Suicide
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 by Jessica Hutchison
The holiday season can be a difficult time for those who have been touched by suicide. For me, the holidays are a reminder of my own dad’s suicide. I will never forget the phone conversation I had with my dad the night before Thanksgiving, 2011. He wasn’t himself; something just wasn’t right. While a month would pass before his life ended, I often consider that night to be the turning point in his life.
A Resource for Rebuilding your Family after the Death of a Loved One, Book Review
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After the death of a spouse or a child a family is consumed by the steps necessary to find stability. Sometimes, when a bereaved parent reviews the past, they will see that there has not been a sense of family stability for a long time. Suicide is sometimes preceded with a history of mental health crises and behavioral reactions that disrupt family life.

Archives:

From the Desk of...Father Rubey
Sunday, September 01, 2013 by Father Rubey
As we enter the autumn part of the year, Labor Day is the last of the summer season celebrations and the beginning of autumn. There can be a letdown feeling as we prepare for the shorter days and colder weather. Actually, autumn can be quite nice with warm weather and the changing of the colors. People love to be outdoors and soak up the crisp air and see all of the wonders of nature as the leaves change into vibrant and rich colors. This time of the year is truly a wonder to behold. I hope that many of you are able to enjoy the outdoors and witness the nature that is all around us –the wonders of creation.
Attachments and Imprints
Sunday, September 01, 2013 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
When a child begins life, its first developmental task is to attach to the caregiver.   There is no “other” as it is cradled and fed, only the cries for connection when separation is experienced.  And for the parent, the boundary between self and child seems mysteriously non-existent for a while. As the child matures and is compelled to explore the world, distancing is exciting, but also uncomfortable enough that the child looks backward often to balance the stimulation with a sense of security.  The parent, too, is attentive, even vigilant, as the young child pushes toward gradual independence.  Most caregivers will recall some anxiety as they observed this process in the small being that introduced them to the profound experience of  bonding.  Most of us learn to attach and to support our loved ones’ independence without a great sense of disruption.  As we become more secure adults, we learn to give space for self-determination to those we care about.  When we carry the attached relationships within us, the connections become flexible and don’t suffer whether our loved ones are close by or in another country. Even with distance, the attachments are not disrupted.