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LOSS Program Office
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Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Father Ruby
Oftentimes I have heard from people surviving a death from suicide that their souls seem dead. This crushing blow has literally deadened one’s spirit. All around survivors the world goes on but for the survivor the world has come to a crashing halt. The world has stopped and unfortunately survivors cannot get off.
Our Grief and Our Children
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Families are little systems that respond to change on inter-related levels. Think of suicide loss within a family as producing seismic change. While individual elements of our lives have survived the loss, such as other loved ones, home, car and job, they may no longer seem familiar.

Archives:

Younger Children and Parental Loss
Friday, November 01, 2013 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
Younger children are mysterious in that they can be amazingly honest and straightforward and equally abstract.  Children as young as age two and three can already mask feelings and defend against the reality of a loss.  We see a range of grief responses and adaptation to death, just as we do in adults, and similar to adults, a stable home base plays a role in the adjustment process.
When Teens Grieve a Sibling’s Suicide
Tuesday, October 01, 2013 by Cynthia Waderlow, LCSW, MSE and Deborah Major, PhD, LCSW
Family systems are often initially paralyzed by the suicide death of a child, with parents being the primary focus of grief support, as suicide grief literature has identified the loss of a child as among the most devastating for the parents. A study on sibling suicide bereavement for children who are still at home identify these children and adolescents as “the forgotten bereaved,” where “necessary help is impeded due to the extraordinary experience, leaving siblings outside the circle of friends and parental grief community” (Dyregrov & Dyregrov, 2005).