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Chicago, IL 60654

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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Friday, April 20, 2018 by Father Ruby
In May our country celebrates Mother’s Day which is a day when we honor our Mothers who are still here and fondly remember those Mothers who are a part of the hereafter. For those Mothers who are grieving the death of a child from suicide or those children who are grieving the loss of a Mother from suicide this is an especially painful day.
Family Conflict after a Suicide Loss
Friday, April 20, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Infighting and conflict after the death of a primary family member is a difficult but recognized manifestation of grief. Suicide grief, in particular, can take us down to base level, sometimes to our most primitive responses of blame and rage. These initial feelings are common, and often part of the changed world after suicide loss.

Archives:

Remembering Paul
Wednesday, August 07, 2013 by Steve Moore
Early in NBC’s broadcast of the 2008 Ironman Hawaii, the narrator says that there is a time cutoff for the swim and failing to make it will result in a competitor being removed from the race. As he is speaking, a man hurries out of the water and up some steps, stumbles a few feet and collapses. Most viewers probably thought: “That was a bad, unprepared swimmer.” They are right. I am a bad swimmer and I wasn’t as prepared as I should have been. But there is more to the story than can be shown in ten seconds of television.
Grief and Family Development: When Children Refuse Counseling
Wednesday, August 07, 2013 by Deborah R. Major, Ph.D., L.C.S.W
Lately, we have heard parents express concerns over what they should do if children refuse counseling following a family member’s suicide. We understand that concern, given the research that examines the characteristics of child survivors of suicide.* We recently heard about an adult survivor who lost a parent as a child and who told her mother at the time that she did not want to attend counseling. Today this same survivor is asking her mother why she was not made to attend counseling anyway, recognizing in retrospect how much she needed it. This story speaks to the gradual accretion of developmental competence and maturity around decision-making, competence that young children do not have, which adds to the complexity of helping them make good choices.