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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

Keeper of Memories
Wednesday, November 28, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
I’d like to extend some brief thoughts about family grief through the holidays. There is a lot written on the subject to be found on the internet and various bereavement books. No wonder, because holiday traditions have “normal” and “what we always do” baked into them. When a loved one central to the family has died from suicide, these days can be approached with perhaps too much hope that they will help us feel better, or only dread or confusion.
From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Father Ruby
Oftentimes I have heard from people surviving a death from suicide that their souls seem dead. This crushing blow has literally deadened one’s spirit. All around survivors the world goes on but for the survivor the world has come to a crashing halt. The world has stopped and unfortunately survivors cannot get off.

Archives:

Watching for Depression in the Grieving Family
Saturday, March 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
During counseling intakes for the LOSS Program for Children and Youth we often hear parents’ concerns that their child may be depressed or will develop a serious depression in response to the suicide loss of a parent, sibling or someone close to them. We are glad to hear caregivers express this concern at the outset because it conveys understanding that the loss can be life-changing and the needs of each person in the surviving family have changed. Watching and assessing grieving children is the right response, and distinguishing grief from depression calls for the experience of a clinician or good, basic mental health information. The caregiving adult who attempts to monitor the grief responses of children and adolescents needs a sense of what healthy grief involves and what could be problematic.
From the Desk of Deborah Major
Saturday, March 01, 2014 by Deborah Major
Suicide’s unexpected and violent intrusion into our life space throws everything up in the air, the way we imagine an unexpected explosion might propel objects out and away from its central force. Cherished beliefs about oneself, the future, and how the world is supposed to operate are suddenly called into question. Nothing is as we thought. Everything feels unstable, chaotic, random, and unjust; at least in the beginning of the grief journey. This is where many survivors find themselves when we first meet them in our support groups. We suggest that LOSS members come back to the groups for as long as it feels helpful, regardless of how long that is, because in these groups you will find yourself among a nurturing network of other survivors, at varying distances from their loss. It is not unusual to meet in the same monthly group new survivors whose loss was barely three months ago, together with those whose loss occurred one, two, four, seven years ago and beyond. We have heard from new survivors that it can be frightening to enter the room and find group members whose loss was many years ago. We think this fear comes from assuming that the survivor whose loss occurred ten years ago feels the same way as the person whose loss occurred three months ago. This is rarely, if ever, the case. People return year after year because they have something to contribute to others and also because there is something present in the circle that they came to receive.