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LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

During the Intense Grieving Process
Thursday, February 23, 2017 by Rev. Charles T. Rubey

During the intense grieving process, feelings such as guilt and remorse are magnified and exaggerated and blown out of proportion.  They are larger than life proportions.  Because the grieving process is not based on reason and cannot be intellectually figured out, it is an emotional thunderstorm, hurricane typhoon and tornado all wrapped into one. 

“I was a lousy parent.”

“I was a poor spouse.” 

During other periods when the intense grief is on a more even keel, then these feelings of guilt or remorse or other feelings are deflated and are looked upon in  a more reasonable and logical light.  One can say, “I was a good parent” or, “I was a good spouse.” 

During these periods, the grieving process is more similar to a summer shower or, in the words of the Irish, “A soft day.”  The grieving process is like a roller coaster, it ebbs and flows during different periods of our lives.  It waxes and wanes.  The storm can rage out of control and around an anniversary, a birthday or holidays, or it can begin to rage for no known cause. 

It is like that sudden tornado or hurricane that can devastate a community with no forewarning.  It is during those times that the pain becomes overwhelming and unbearable.  This is not a retrenching, this is not a setback, this is nothing more than the normal grieving process running its course.  There is no time when a survivor can say, “The grieving process is over”, “I am finished grieving.”  When the storm of grief is raging, it is very frightening. 

It is during those times that we recommend that you call us so that we can assist you during this time.  You will always find an understanding ear with our LOSS staff.  These times are not a permanent retrenching, but only a temporary, and hopefully, a short-lived return of the intense grief.  Call us; we are here to help you and assist you. 

As always, let us remember in thought and prayer our LOSS family – especially those family members who are observing an anniversary of death or a birthday or other significant date. 

Keep on Keepin’ on



Archives:

During the Intense Grieving Process
Thursday, February 23, 2017 by Rev. Charles T. Rubey

During the intense grieving process, feelings such as guilt and remorse are magnified and exaggerated and blown out of proportion.  They are larger than life proportions.  Because the grieving process is not based on reason and cannot be intellectually figured out, it is an emotional thunderstorm, hurricane typhoon and tornado all wrapped into one. 

“I was a lousy parent.”

“I was a poor spouse.” 

During other periods when the intense grief is on a more even keel, then these feelings of guilt or remorse or other feelings are deflated and are looked upon in  a more reasonable and logical light.  One can say, “I was a good parent” or, “I was a good spouse.” 

During these periods, the grieving process is more similar to a summer shower or, in the words of the Irish, “A soft day.”  The grieving process is like a roller coaster, it ebbs and flows during different periods of our lives.  It waxes and wanes.  The storm can rage out of control and around an anniversary, a birthday or holidays, or it can begin to rage for no known cause. 

It is like that sudden tornado or hurricane that can devastate a community with no forewarning.  It is during those times that the pain becomes overwhelming and unbearable.  This is not a retrenching, this is not a setback, this is nothing more than the normal grieving process running its course.  There is no time when a survivor can say, “The grieving process is over”, “I am finished grieving.”  When the storm of grief is raging, it is very frightening. 

It is during those times that we recommend that you call us so that we can assist you during this time.  You will always find an understanding ear with our LOSS staff.  These times are not a permanent retrenching, but only a temporary, and hopefully, a short-lived return of the intense grief.  Call us; we are here to help you and assist you. 

As always, let us remember in thought and prayer our LOSS family – especially those family members who are observing an anniversary of death or a birthday or other significant date. 

Keep on Keepin’ on