Catholic Charities Administrative Offices - (312) 655-7000.

Catholic Charities Social Services
- email GetHelp@catholiccharities.net, or call (312) 655-7700 in Chicago or (847) 782-4000 in Lake County and someone will assist you. Call volume is extremely high so email is recommended if you are unable to find what you need on the web site.

NEW: Counseling Support Line:  (312) 948-6951 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

To donate to our work by phone, call (312) 948-6087.  Every gift helps someone in need. 

mRelief Logo

Need financial assistance?

First, see if you qualify by using our online questionnaire: Rent, SNAP or Utility AssistanceThen Call

311

Chicago

(877) 426-6515

Suburban Cook

(847) 782-4000

Lake County


Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:


Archives:

Attending to Family Grief
Friday, April 1, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Grief really is a family process.  It is private, but also influenced by and shared with family members.  When families use our LOSS Program for Children and Youth we meet unique configurations of individuals that are differentiated by birth order, temperament and personality, gender and age, family role and relationship with the person who died.   After a suicide the caregiver or parent is faced with a sense of need on the part of all of her children at once; yet each one may be presenting differently.  And there is a range of grief responses among children as well as adults that are influenced by developmental stage as well as the attributes I’ve mentioned.  So, how do you attend to the different needs of your bereaved children?  They are watching you in your grief, and you are setting an example for authenticity, hopefulness and the ability to compartmentalize your emotions as your care for those who depend on you.  You begin the process of rebuilding your family by questioning and attending to each child’s loss needs and developmental tasks.  You can reflect to each child what you see and hear as they respond to their loss, and also model self-care, and valuing of genuine grief expression.
From the Desk of Rev. Richard Jakubik
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 by Rev. Richard Jakubik
Facing suicide with Faith

“Nothing seems to matter anymore since my loved-one took his life,” said a client in a past therapy session.  “My job feels empty, my connection to family is shaken, and any past sense of well-being has been shattered.”   “I’ve lost my sense of purpose and I’m drifting away from everything and everyone that used to anchor me.” This survivor of suicide is going through what has been defined by psychotherapists as complicated or deep grief.  Losing someone you love to suicide cuts into your heart and forever redefines you and the world you live in.   Though not all survivors grieve the same way or for the same length of time, it is still essential that a survivor comes to terms with the loss and finds inner healing in their life.