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COVID-19 Services/Response:

Our thanks to the remarkable staff, partners, donors, and volunteers who are helping us meet the needs of those least able to navigate these unprecedented circumstances. We are in your debt.

Service Update:

  • For urgent needs, please call 312-655-7700
  • Meals to go are available at Congregate Meal sites and Senior Centers. Catholic Charities has suspended all senior group activities and adult day care amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Our home care services continue, and are following a more sophisticated protocol as there are seniors who have no one to drop off groceries and provide basic hygiene assistance.
  • Food pantries and evening meal programs will continue to provide food depending on supplies and safe distribution protocols. Please check under Our Services/Emergency Services for locations and phone numbers.
  • Counseling, case management, and other services that can be provided remotely are being delivered accordingly. Please call your case worker or program contact if you need assistance.

How You Can Help:
Due to COVID-19 exposure risks, we are unable to take donations of clothing or food from individuals or groups at this time.  

  • Please consider a contribution. The need for financial assistance and program support for those who were only just making ends meet will grow significantly with lost wages and other impact from the pandemic.
  • Masks, hand sanitizer, paper towels, or bleach wipes are needed and can be dropped at any Catholic Charities location. 
  • When shopping on Amazon, please use Amazon Smile and choose Catholic Charities so we might benefit from your purchase. 
  • Volunteers needed to pack food at pantries.  If you are not in a high risk category and are willing to help, please email Andrew McKernin at amckernin@catholiccharities.net. Protective gear provided. Health protocols enforced. 
  • Thank the human service workers, first responders, and grocery/gas station/coffee vendors in your life and when you see them in action.

For more information on COVID19, visit the CDC website.


Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:


Archives:

Attachments and Imprints
Sunday, September 1, 2013 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
When a child begins life, its first developmental task is to attach to the caregiver.   There is no “other” as it is cradled and fed, only the cries for connection when separation is experienced.  And for the parent, the boundary between self and child seems mysteriously non-existent for a while. As the child matures and is compelled to explore the world, distancing is exciting, but also uncomfortable enough that the child looks backward often to balance the stimulation with a sense of security.  The parent, too, is attentive, even vigilant, as the young child pushes toward gradual independence.  Most caregivers will recall some anxiety as they observed this process in the small being that introduced them to the profound experience of  bonding.  Most of us learn to attach and to support our loved ones’ independence without a great sense of disruption.  As we become more secure adults, we learn to give space for self-determination to those we care about.  When we carry the attached relationships within us, the connections become flexible and don’t suffer whether our loved ones are close by or in another country. Even with distance, the attachments are not disrupted.
Remembering Paul
Wednesday, August 7, 2013 by Steve Moore
Early in NBC’s broadcast of the 2008 Ironman Hawaii, the narrator says that there is a time cutoff for the swim and failing to make it will result in a competitor being removed from the race. As he is speaking, a man hurries out of the water and up some steps, stumbles a few feet and collapses. Most viewers probably thought: “That was a bad, unprepared swimmer.” They are right. I am a bad swimmer and I wasn’t as prepared as I should have been. But there is more to the story than can be shown in ten seconds of television.