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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

Getting Back to Normal
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a suicide, how does a family with children think about “normal again?” What is the time involved? How do children and adults work at this?
From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 by Father Rubey
I recently had the opportunity to co-facilitate one of our monthly grief support groups. Fully half of the group members were totally new to LOSS, having lost their loved ones to suicide just a couple of months ago. Many different relationship losses were represented and the ages of those who had died reached across the life span. Some group members had prior awareness of their loved one’s struggles and vulnerabilities, while others had absolutely no idea that this tragedy could ever be a possibility in their family. And while they told different stories of their loved ones’ path to suicide, they shared similar concerns and questions. I imagine that some were also wrestling with questions or doubts that they may not have wanted to voice, yet.

Archives:

When Teens Grieve a Sibling’s Suicide
Sunday, January 01, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW & Deborah Major, PhD, LCSW
Family systems are often initially paralyzed by the suicide death of a child, with parents being the primary focus of grief support, as suicide grief literature has identified the loss of a child as among the most devastating for parents.   A 2005 study on sibling suicide bereavement for children who are still at home identify these children and adolescents as “the forgotten bereaved,” where  “necessary help is impeded due to the extraordinary experience leaving siblings outside the circle of friends and parental grief community”  (Dyregrov  &  Dyregrov, 2005).   
From the Desk of Father Rubey
Sunday, January 01, 2017 by Father Rubey
As we begin a New Year, many survivors begin or continue on their grief journey. In the immediate aftermath of losing a loved person to suicide survivors are in a state of shock. They can’t believe that this loved one actually took their life. For some this fact can be very difficult to admit, the unspeakable act of suicide has happened to their family now. Survivors oftentimes walk around in a daze for a long time trying to figure out why and what lead this loved one to perform such an awful and destructive act.